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CHRISTIAN DECORATING IDEAS. DECORATING IDEAS


Christian Decorating Ideas. Decorative Metal Wall Hanging.



Christian Decorating Ideas





christian decorating ideas






    decorating
  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)





    christian
  • following the teachings or manifesting the qualities or spirit of Jesus Christ

  • relating to or characteristic of Christianity; "Christian rites"

  • Fletcher (c.1764–93), English seaman and mutineer. In April 1789, as first mate under Captain Bligh on the HMS Bounty, he seized the ship and cast Bligh and others adrift. In 1790, the mutineers settled on Pitcairn Island, where Christian was probably killed by Tahitians

  • a religious person who believes Jesus is the Christ and who is a member of a Christian denomination





    ideas
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"

  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"

  • An opinion or belief

  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"

  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action

  • A concept or mental impression











christian decorating ideas - Lamps And




Lamps And Shades: Beautiful Ideas To Make And Decorate


Lamps And Shades: Beautiful Ideas To Make And Decorate



Light up your home with a stunning collection of lamps and shades from today's top designers! They range from sophisticated and classic to ultra-modern--so you'll definitely find a style to suit your own decor. Start from scratch or choose from a myriad of ideas to decorate store-bought shades and bases. "Once again...designer Bawden scores with her do-it-yourself approach, this time to home fashions...15 projects....Some are charmingly primitive...Others could pass for professional....Certainly, there are enough projects to choose from--and there is an abundance of written instructions and step-by-step color photographs....Adding to the reader's delight is a gallery showcasing a variety of possible embellishments...."--Booklist. "...imaginative..."--Better Homes & Gardens Do-It-Yourself. 128 pages (all in color), 9 x 9 1/2. NEW IN PAPERBACK.










89% (14)





The Cross




The Cross





181,560 items / 1,432,048 views

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The Christian cross, seen as a representation of the instrument of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, is the best-known religious symbol of Christianity. It is related to the crucifix (a cross that includes a usually three-dimensional representation of Jesus' body) and to the more general family of cross symbols.


Pre-Christian crosses

The cross-shaped sign, represented in its simplest form by a crossing of two lines at right angles, greatly antedates, in both East and West, the introduction of Christianity. It goes back to a very remote period of human civilization. It is supposed to have been used not just for its ornamental value, but also with religious significance.[1]

Some have sought to attach to the widespread use of this sign, in particular in its swastika form, a real ethnographic importance. It may have represented the apparatus used in kindling fire, and thus as the symbol of sacred fire or as a symbol of the sun, denoting its daily rotation. It has also been interpreted as the mystic representation of lightning or of the god of the tempest, and even the emblem of the Aryan pantheon and the primitive Aryan civilization.[1]

Another symbol that has been connected with the cross is the ansated cross (ankh or crux ansata) of the ancient Egyptians, which often appears as a symbolic sign in the hands of the goddess Sekhet, and appears as a hieroglyphic sign of life or of the living. In later times the Egyptian Christians (Copts), attracted by its form, and perhaps by its symbolism, adopted it as the emblem of the cross.[1] In his book, The Worship of the Dead (London, 1904), p. 226, Colonel J. Garnier wrote: "The cross in the form of the 'Crux Ansata'… was carried in the hands of the Egyptian priests and Pontiff kings as the symbol of their authority as priests of the Sun god and was called 'the Sign of Life'."

In the Bronze Age we meet in different parts of Europe a more accurate representation of the cross, as conceived in Christian art, and in this shape it was soon widely diffused. This more precise characterization coincides with a corresponding general change in customs and beliefs. The cross is now met with, in various forms, on many objects: fibulas, cinctures, earthenware fragments, and on the bottom of drinking vessels. De Mortillet is of opinion that such use of the sign was not merely ornamental, but rather a symbol of consecration, especially in the case of objects pertaining to burial. In the proto-Etruscan cemetery of Golasecca every tomb has a vase with a cross engraved on it. True crosses of more or less artistic design have been found in Tiryns, at Mycen?, in Crete, and on a fibula from Vulci.[1]
[edit] Early Christian use

During the first two centuries of Christianity, the cross may have been rare in Christian iconography, as it depicts a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. The Chi-Rho monogram, which was adopted by Constantine I in the 4th century as his banner (see labarum), was another Early Christian symbol of wide use.

However, the cross symbol was already associated with Christians in the 2nd century, as is indicated in the anti-Christian arguments cited in the Octavius of Minucius Felix, chapters IX and XXIX, written at the end of that century or the beginning of the next,[2] and by the fact that by the early 3rd century the cross had become so closely associated with Christ that Clement of Alexandria, who died between 211 and 216, could without fear of ambiguity use the phrase ?? ???????? ??????? (the Lord's sign) to mean the cross, when he repeated the idea, current as early as the apocryphal Epistle of Barnabas, that the number 318 (in Greek numerals, ???) in Genesis 14:14 was interpreted as a foreshadowing (a "type") of the cross (T, an upright with crossbar, standing for 300) and of Jesus (??, the first two letter of his name ??????, standing for 18),[3] and his contemporary Tertullian could designate the body of Christian believers as crucis religiosi, i.e. "devotees of the Cross".[4] In his book De Corona, written in 204, Tertullian tells how it was already a tradition for Christians to trace repeatedly on their foreheads the sign of the cross.[5]

The Jewish Encyclopedia says:

The cross as a Christian symbol or "seal" came into use at least as early as the second century (see "Apost. Const." iii. 17; Epistle of Barnabas, xi.-xii.; Justin, "Apologia," i. 55-60; "Dial. cum Tryph." 85-97); and the marking of a cross upon the forehead and the chest was regarded as a talisman against the powers of demons (Tertullian, "De Corona," iii.; Cyprian, "Testimonies," xi. 21–22; Lactantius, "Divin? Institutiones," iv. 27, and elsewhere). Accordingly the Christian Fathers had to defend themselves, as early as the second c











the liberation Hall in Kehlheim Bavaria HDR




the liberation Hall in Kehlheim Bavaria HDR





Long before he became king (in 1825), Ludwig I of Bavaria had travelled in the Kelheim area, and he know Kelheim, Weltenburg , and the Altmuehl valley very well. King Ludwig wanted to build a Liberation Hall in memory of the liberators of Germany who helped to save Europe from Napoleonic suppression, and he believed that the best site for the Liberation Hall was on the view on the valley of the spur-shaped hill between Altmuehl and Danube with the picturesque view on the valley of the Danube and the old town with numerous connections to the early history of the House of Wittelsbach. And the king cherished the fact that the site was in the middle of prehistoric fortifications.
The site (about 125 acres) was bought in 1838 and levelled in 1842 after a mountain road broad enough for construction machinery had been built. These works alone provided about 800 jobs for men from the Kelheim area.
As had been planned, on October 18th, 1842, the foundation stone was laid in the presence of the king and members of the royal court, with hundreds of people from Kelheim and neighbouring villages watching the ceremonies. The town council had ordered to hoist flags and to decorate the houses many of which were freshly painted.
Actual construction works began in 1843. Laying the foundations proved to be very difficult and very expensive because there were clefts and cavities in the site. Foundation works were not finished before 1845, though 160 workers were constantly employed.
In the summer of 1845, stonemasons began to shape the massive blocks for constructing the base. Orders were given for providing the building materials. The third step of the base construction was not yet finished when the architect, Friedrich von Gaertner, died suddenly in April, 1847. All work was stopped immediately.
Some weeks later King Ludwig ordered the architect Leo von Klenze to go on with the work. Klenze, an architect renowned for his classicist ideas, was granted a free hand as to the design of the building.



In the summer of 1847, Klenze presented his first plans to the king. He had accepted Gaertner?s idea of an circular passage and a dome, but he had changed forms according to his classicist ideas. After some time, however, Klenze made up his mind to abandon these elements, and step by step he worked out detailed plans for the Hall on Gaertner?s base of blocks as we can see it now. It was a completely different building.
No sooner had work in Kelheim begun than revolution broke out in Munich in March, 1848, which ended with the abdication of King Ludwig I. All work was stopped again; the building site was abandoned.
For the circular passage 36 columns had been cut of granite in the mountains. They were of no use now. The smaller columns, 17 feet long and weighing 6.7 short tons, had already been transported to the site. The transport of the bigger columns, weighing 33 short tone, proved to be impossible because a bridge in the country was not strong enough. For want of money nothing was done to manage the transportation until decades later the columns were used for some government buildings in Munich.
One year after his abdication, Ludwig I. made up his mind to continue building the Liberation Hall and to provide the necessary money from his private revenue, and he vowed: "The Hall will be as big and glorious as planned, though it may last a little longer until is finished".
The finishing was once more endangered when Ludwig fell seriously ill in 1854. On October 18th, 1863, just in the time for the fiftieth anniversary of the Great Battle of the Nations near Leipzig, the Liberation Hall in Kelheim was solemnly inaugurated by Ludwig.
The imposing Hall rises over the base to which a representative flight of stairs is leading. The walls of the circular building, plastered in a warm yellow colour, are divided by 18 pilasters with 18 chandeliers. The pilasters are crowned by female figures which symbolise the German tribes having taken part in the Great Battle (e.g. Hessians, Suabians, Thuringians ...) - and to be honest, it was rather difficult and hair-splitting to complete exactly the number 18. In the zone of the walls above the figures there is a gallery with pillars in Tuscan order, and the final part is an open passage which allows the view on the wide valleys. Its stone balustrades correspond to the divisions of the gallery, and its wall is equipped with pilasters and decorated with trophies. Thus Klenze tried to combine the different forms to a harmonious whole. The Hall is crowned by a cone-shaped copper roof and a glazed opening in the apex. The colossal Hall measures 96.7 feet in diameter and is 147.6 feet high. Inside, the walls are covered with marble. There are two storeys, a row of niches and, upstairs, a gallery with pillars. The 18 niches form the background for the bigger than life-size victory sculptures (sculpted by Schwanthaler and Widenmann). These sculptures symbolise the 34 states which formed the Ge









christian decorating ideas








christian decorating ideas




Christian Home Interior Decor (Home Decor)






Christian Home Interior Decor teaches you the 5 key things you have to consider when choosing home decor accents for an Christian themed home. It gives you perfect examples of how you can inject authentic Christian style into the rooms of your home and teaches you how to make your Christian home decor three-dimensional.


EXCERPT

Colors
Colors that are perfect for a Christian themed home interior decoration include:
Red representing the blood of Jesus
White representing purity
Blue and red from the Christian flag


For affordable home decor, these “Christian colors” can be incorporated into your home through:
Wall clocks
Christian flag wall hangings
Christian flag shower curtains
Red velvet cushion covers
Red and white sofa set throws



Patterns
Patterns that are perfect for a Christian themed modern home interior include:
Crosses
Praying hands
Angels


These “Christian patterns” can be incorporated into your home interior decoration through:
Framed wall paintings
Curtains and drapes
Candleholders
Coasters
Angels switch plate covers


ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Dr Miriam Kinai is a medical doctor who has specialized in dermatology, a certified aromatherapist and a trained Christian counselor.

Christian Home Interior Decor teaches you the 5 key things you have to consider when choosing home decor accents for an Christian themed home. It gives you perfect examples of how you can inject authentic Christian style into the rooms of your home and teaches you how to make your Christian home decor three-dimensional.


EXCERPT

Colors
Colors that are perfect for a Christian themed home interior decoration include:
Red representing the blood of Jesus
White representing purity
Blue and red from the Christian flag


For affordable home decor, these “Christian colors” can be incorporated into your home through:
Wall clocks
Christian flag wall hangings
Christian flag shower curtains
Red velvet cushion covers
Red and white sofa set throws



Patterns
Patterns that are perfect for a Christian themed modern home interior include:
Crosses
Praying hands
Angels


These “Christian patterns” can be incorporated into your home interior decoration through:
Framed wall paintings
Curtains and drapes
Candleholders
Coasters
Angels switch plate covers


ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Dr Miriam Kinai is a medical doctor who has specialized in dermatology, a certified aromatherapist and a trained Christian counselor.










See also:

small bathroom decorating

1950's kitchen decor

decorating table tops

country homes decorating

christmas candle decoration

cad decor paradyz

decorating window treatment

tuscan wedding decor



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